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Italy in Photos

Photos of Italy taken on Walks in the Cities Towns & Villages of Italia

Welcome to Italy in Photos and immerse yourself in the breathtaking beauty of Fano, a mesmerizing city in in the region of Marche: – Fano is a coastal town and comune in the Marche region of Italy, with a population of about 60,000 people. It is one of the oldest and most popular seaside resorts on the Adriatic Sea, as well as a historical and cultural centre. Fano was founded by the Romans in the 2nd century BC and named Fanum Fortunae after a temple of the goddess Fortuna. It was a strategic port and junction, where the Via Flaminia from Rome met the coastal road. It still preserves some remarkable monuments from its ancient past, such as the Arch of Augustus, the Porta Maggiore, and the Roman walls. Fano also has a rich artistic and architectural heritage from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, when it was ruled by various feudal lords, such as the Malatesta, the della Rovere, and the Papacy. It boasts a beautiful cathedral, a splendid court palace, several churches and museums, and an open-air art gallery. Fano is famous for its carnival, one of the oldest and most renowned in Italy, dating back to 1347. It features colourful floats, masks, costumes, music, and confetti. It also has a lively nightlife, with many bars, restaurants, and clubs. Fano is an ideal destination for anyone who loves sun, sea, sand, history, culture, and fun. It is a town that offers something for everyone, and that will charm you with its beauty and hospitality.

Via IV Novembre is a street in Fano which runs from the outskirts of the town to Via Monte Grappa (Photos 1-2-3-5) – Parrocchia Santi Leonardo e Giovanni Bosco is a parish church in Fano, Italy, dedicated to Saint Leonard of Noblac and Saint John Bosco, the patron saints of prisoners and young people respectively. The church was founded in 1950 by Father Giuseppe Pizzichini, who wanted to create a place of worship and education for the poor and marginalized children of the town. It has a simple and modern architecture, with a rectangular plan and a single nave. The façade is decorated with a mosaic of Christ the King, surrounded by angels and saints. The interior has a wooden ceiling and stained glass windows depicting scenes from the lives of Saint Leonard and Saint John Bosco1. (Photo 4) –  Via Marcello Negusanti is a street in Fano which runs from Via IV Novembre to Via Garibaldi (Photo 6) – Via Francesco Palazzi is a street in Fano which runs from Via Roma to Via Monte Grappa (Photo 7) – Via Monte Grappa is a street in Fano which runs from Via IV Novembre to Via Cavour (Photo 8) – Viale Antonio Gramsci is a street in Fano which runs from Via Monte Grappa to Largo di Porta Maggiore (Photo 9) – Viale XII Settembre is a street in Fano which runs from Viale Antonio Gramsci to the Stazione FS di Fano. You will be able to see the splendid tower of the Chiesa e Convento di San Paterniano. (Photos 10-11-12) – Via F. Cavallotti is a street in Fano which runs from Via Carlo Pisacane to Via Mura Malatestiane (Photos 13-14) – Viale Cesare Battist is a street in Fano which runs from Via F. Cavallotti to Viale Adriatico (Photos 15-16) – Lungomare Giovanni Paolo II is a seaside promenade in Fano It is named after Pope John Paul II, who visited Fano in 19851. (Photos 17-18-19-20) –  Viale Cristoforo Colombo is a street in Fano which runs from Via Arco D’Augusto to Viale Adriatico (Photo 21) – Passeggiata del Lisippo:- This is a pedestrian walkway that runs along the beach and offers a panoramic view of the Adriatic Sea. It is also home to a bronze statue of the ancient Greek sculptor Lysippos, who was born in Fano. (Photos 22-23-24) – Lungomare Mediterraneo:- This is a stretch of sandy beach that is popular with tourists and locals alike. It has several facilities such as sunbeds, umbrellas, showers, and bars. It is also the venue for many events and festivals throughout the year. (Photo 25) – Via della Marina is a street in Fano which runs from Via della Marina to Viale Adriatico (Photo 26) – Viale Adriatico: This is a road that connects Lungomare Giovanni Paolo II with the historical center of Fano. It has many shops, restaurants, and hotels along its sides. It is also a good place to admire the sunset over the sea. (Photos 27-28-29-30)

El pont de Barboncan is a bridge that can be found along Via Cesare Simonetti (Photos 31-32) – Via Cairoli is a street in Fano. It is close to the beach of Lido, where you can enjoy the sun and the sea. It is named after Giuseppe Garibaldi’s lieutenant, Francesco Cairoli, who fought for the unification of Italy. (Photos 33-34-35) – Viale Fratelli Cairoli is a street in Fano which runs from Piazzale Amendola to Via Gaspare Spontini (Photos 36-37) – The Parrocchia Chiesa San Giuseppe al Porto Fano is a parish church in Fano, that belongs to the Order of Saint Augustine. It is located on Viale Fratelli Cairoli 52. The church is dedicated to Saint Joseph, the patron saint of workers and carpenters. The church was built in the 18th century and has a baroque style. The church has a single nave with six side chapels and a presbytery with a high altar. The church also has a bell tower and a convent attached to it. (Photos 37-38) – Via Gentile da Fabriano is a street in Fano which runs from Via Gaspare Spontini to Viale Cesare Battisti (Photos 39-40) – Via Cavour is a street in Fano which runs from Via Monte Grappa to Piazza Antonio Costanzi (Photos 41-43) – Via Vecchia is a dead-end street in Fano and can be found along Via Cavour (Photo 42) – Via del Vasaro is a street in Fano which runs from Via Malagodi to Via Cavour (Photos 44-45) – Via S. Leonardo is a street in Fano which runs from Via Cavour to Via S. Paterniano (Photos 46-47) – Piazza Antonio Costanzi is a square in Fano. The square is named after Antonio Costanzi, a composer and musician who was born in Fano in 1700 and died in Rome in 17781. The square is located in the historical center of the city. (Photos 48-52) – In the sqaure you will find the Chiesa di Sant’Antonio Abate that is dedicated to Saint Anthony the Abbot, the patron saint of animals and farmers. The Chiesa di Sant’Antonio Abate is a church in Fano, Italy, that is dedicated to Saint Anthony the Abbot, the patron saint of animals and farmers. The church was originally built in 1431, but it was damaged by heavy rains in 1740 and rebuilt in 1749 by the architect Gianfrancesco Buonamici. The church has an octagonal plan with a single nave and a polygonal apse. The church also has a bell tower with a spire. The church was destroyed again by bombing in 1944 and restored after the war by the architect Riccardo Pacini. The exterior of the church has a pseudo-gothic coating that was added in 1922. The interior of the church preserves its 18th-century layout and decorations. The church has some valuable paintings by local artists, such as Carlo Magini, Sebastiano Ceccarini, and Francesco Pittoni2. Some of the paintings depict Saint Anthony the Abbot, the Holy Family, and other saints. The church also has frescoes and marble sculptures that are original or restored. (Photos 49-50-51) – Corso G. Matteotti is a street in Fano and it is one of the main streets of the city centre. It is named after Giacomo Matteotti, an Italian socialist politician who was assassinated in 1924 by fascists. It has a length of about 1.2 km, and it runs from Piazza Antonio Costanzi to the roundabout on the SS16. It is a pedestrian zone, where cars are not allowed, and is lined with shops, cafes, restaurants. It is a popular place for locals and tourists to stroll, shop, and enjoy the atmosphere of the city. (Photos 53-54-55-56-64-66-67)

The Fontana della Fortuna is a fountain that features a bronze statue of the goddess Fortuna, modeled and cast in 1593 by the Urbino artist Donnino Ambrosi. The fountain has a large basin with colored marble and was entirely renovated in 1697-99 by the Venetian architect Ludovico Torresini. (Photo 57) – Piazza XX Settembre is the main square of the historical center of Fano. The square is named after September 20, the date of the capture of Rome by the Italian troops in 1870, which completed the unification of Italy. The square is home to some important historical buildings, such as The Palazzo del Podestà2, a 14th-century palace that was the seat of the local government. The palace was renamed Palazzo della Ragione, or Palace of Reason, in the 15th century, when it became a court of justice. The palace is now the Teatro della Fortuna, a theater that hosts various shows and events. The facade of the palace has a Romanesque-Gothic style and the interior has a neoclassical style. A 19th-century addition is the crenellated merlon. Outside, there is a civic tower that was rebuilt after the war instead of the old bell tower. (Photos 58-59-63) – The Chiesa di San Silvestro Fano is a church in Fano, that is located inPiazza XX Settembre . It is dedicated to Saint Sylvester, the pope who baptized Constantine the Great. The church has a long and interesting history, dating back to the 15th century. The church was originally built in 1431, but it was damaged by heavy rains in 1740 and rebuilt in 1749 by the architect Gianfrancesco Buonamici. The church has an octagonal plan with a single nave and a polygonal apse. The church also has a bell tower with a spire. The church was destroyed again by bombing in 1944 and restored after the war by the architect Riccardo Pacini. The exterior of the church has a pseudo-gothic coating that was added in 1922. The interior of the church preserves its 18th-century layout and decorations. The church has some valuable paintings by local artists, such as Carlo Magini, Sebastiano Ceccarini, and Francesco Pittoni. Some of the paintings depict Saint Anthony the Abbot, the Holy Family, and other saints. The church also has frescoes and marble sculptures that are original or restored. (Photos 59-60-61-62)

Giardini Pier Maria Amiani Fano are public gardens in Fano. They are named after Pier Maria Amiani, a local historian and politician who wrote the Memorie istoriche della città di Fano in the 18th century. The gardens are located near the Piazza Pier Maria Amiani, a square that has a sculpture garden and a fountain. The gardens are a nice place to relax, enjoy nature. (Photo 68) – Via Arco D’Augusto Fano is a street in Fano, which runs from Via Dè Martinozzi to the roudabout on the SS16. It is named after the Arch of Augustus, a Roman monument that marks the entrance to the city from the ancient Via Flaminia1. Here are some details about Via Arco D’Augusto Fano. (Photos 69-70-71-72-84-85) – You will find the Cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta along this street. The Cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta is the main church of Fano. It is also the mother church of the diocese of Fano-Fossombrone-Cagli-Pergola. It was built in the 12th century in Romanesque style, replacing an older church that was destroyed by a fire in 1124. It has a three-nave interior with eight chapels, a large central apse, and a modern bell tower. It was elevated to the rank of minor basilica by Pope Pius XII in 1953. The facade, which has a triangular shape and is divided into three parts by pilasters. The central part has a beautiful portal with sculpted decorations and a rose window above it. The side parts have false arcades with small windows. The pulpit, which was reassembled in the first half of the 20th century using various elements that were either walled up or scattered in the episcopal palace. It has carved panels depicting scenes from the life of Christ and the four evangelists. The Nolfi Chapel, which was built in the 17th century by the noble family of Nolfi. It has a rich Baroque decoration with marble, stucco, and paintings. The main altar has a painting of the Assumption of Mary by Guido Reni. The bell tower, which was rebuilt after the previous one was demolished by the Germans during World War II. It stands on the base of the ancient tower called “Belisario”, which was named after a Byzantine general who defended Fano from the Goths in the 6th century. (Photo 71) – Via Guido del Cassero is a street in Fano which runs from Via Paoli to Via Montevecchio (Photo 73) – Via Montevecchio is a street in Fano which runs from Viale Antonio Gramsci to Via Mura Malatestiane (Photo 74)

The Ex Chiesa di Santa Maria del Suffragio is a former church in Fano, Italy, that was built in the 16th century and later became the seat of the Venerable Confraternity of Santa Maria del Suffragio, an association of faithful devoted to praying for the souls in purgatory. The church has a simple exterior with a triangular facade and a bell tower in Baroque style. The interior is richly decorated with stucco, paintings, and sculptures, especially in the Nolfi Chapel, which was added in the 17th century by a noble family. The church also preserves some relics of saints and martyrs, such as the skull of Saint Fortunatus and the arm of Saint Severinus. (Photos 74-75-76-77) – The square “Pincio” in Fano is a small and charming public space in the historic center of the city, near the Arco di Augusto and the Pincio Charminghouse. It is named after the Pincio hill in Rome, where the ancient Roman aristocracy had their villas. The square has a fountain, a statue of Pope Pius IX, and some benches where you can relax and enjoy the view of the old town. The square is also surrounded by some elegant buildings, such as the Palazzo del Podestà, the Palazzo della Ragione, and the Palazzo del Monte di Pietà. The square is a popular meeting point for locals and tourists, especially during festivals and events. – Via Palazzi Gisberti is a street in Fano which runs from Vicolo Alavolini to Via Arco D’Augusto (Photo 78) –  (Photos 79-80-81-82-83) – The Arco di Augusto in Fano is a city gate in the form of a triumphal arch with three vaults. It was built by the Emperor Augustus in 9 AD to commemorate his victory over the Carthaginian general Hasdrubal Barca in the Battle of Metauro during the Second Punic War. It is one of the symbols of the city and the entrance to the city by the ancient Via Flaminia. The arch has a triangular facade divided into three parts by pilasters. The central part has a portal with sculpted decorations and a rose window above it. The side parts have false arcades with small windows. The arch was originally topped by a large attic with seven arched windows and eight pseudo-columns, but it was destroyed by the artillery of Federico da Montefeltro in 1463 during the siege of Fano. The fallen fragments were reused in the construction of the adjacent church and loggia of Saint Michael, which has a bass relief of the original appearance of the arch on its facade. (Photo 83) – Via XXIV Maggio is a street in Fano which runs from Corso Giacomo Matteotti to Corso Giacomo Matteotti (Photo 86) – Via Giulio Cesare is a street in Fano which runs from Via della Fortezza to Corso Giacomo Matteotti (Photo 87) – Viale Nazario Sauro is a street in Fano which runs from Viale Adriatico to Viale Antonio Gramsci (Photo 88) – The Canale Albani is an artificial canal that crosses the territory of Fano for about 10 km. It was built in the 17th century by the Albani family, who owned lands and mills along the canal. It originates from the north bank of the Metauro river, from which it separates thanks to a barrier that regulates the water flow. It runs parallel to the river for about 3.5 km, then deviates towards the city center of Fano, which it fully crosses. It ends in the Borghese basin, the innermost part of the port of Fano. (Photos 89-90-91)

Via Mura Augustee is a street in Fano, that runs along the ancient Roman walls that were built by Emperor Augustus in the 1st century AD. The walls were originally 1760 meters long and had 28 cylindrical towers and two gates: the Arco di Augusto and the Porta della Mandria. The walls were damaged and partly demolished over the centuries, especially during the war between the Byzantines and the Goths in the 6th century and the siege of Fano by Federico da Montefeltro in the 15th century. Today, only about a third of the original perimeter is visible, mostly on the north side of the city. The walls are made of opus vittatum, a technique that uses horizontal layers of stone blocks, and opus cementicium, a mixture of mortar and stone chips. The walls are a symbol of Fano’s history and a remarkable example of Roman architecture (Photos 92-93-95) -Viale Buozzi is a street in Fano which runs from Viale Antonio Gramsci to Via Monteschiantello (Photo 94) – Via della Mandria is a street in Fano which runs from Via Rinalducci to Via Mura Augustee (Photo 96)

Fano Cuisine:- Fano is a city in the Marche region of Italy, famous for its seaside attractions and historical monuments. Fano also has a rich culinary tradition, influenced by both the sea and the land. Here are some of the local foods you have to try in Fano:-Moretta fanese:- This is a warm drink made with coffee, lemon zest, and a mix of brandy, rum, and anise liqueur. It is said to have originated among the sailors and fishers who used to drink it before going to sea. Moretta fanese is usually served in small glasses, with a layer of liquor, coffee, and foam visible. – Brodetto fanese: – This is a seafood stew made with onion, tomatoes, white wine vinegar, olive oil, and various types of fish and shellfish, such as squid, monkfish, mullet, mantis shrimp, shrimps, mussels, and clams. The broth is thickened with tomato paste and seasoned with salt and pepper. Brodetto fanese is a traditional dish of Fano, often served with bread or polenta. – Cartoceto:- This is a high-quality extra virgin olive oil produced in the area of Cartoceto, near Fano. It is made from a blend of Leccino, Frantoio, and Raggiola olives, which give it a fruity and spicy flavor. Cartoceto oil has a long history of production dating back to the 13th century. It is used for dressing salads, vegetables, soups, and bruschetta. – Casciotta d’Urbino:- This is a semi-soft cheese made from a mix of sheep’s milk and cow’s milk. It has a crumbly texture and a sweet and nutty flavor. Casciotta d’Urbino is produced only between April and September and aged for about 20 to 30 days. It is a versatile cheese that can be paired with light wines and enjoyed in various dishes, such as Crescia Sfogliata di Urbino, a type of flatbread filled with cold cuts and arugula. -Brodetto fanese:- This is a seafood stew made with onion, tomatoes, white wine vinegar, olive oil, and various types of fish and shellfish, such as squid, monkfish, mullet, mantis shrimp, shrimps, mussels, and clams. The broth is thickened with tomato paste and seasoned with salt and pepper.Brodetto fanese is a traditional dish of Fano, often served with bread or polenta.

broken clouds 21° C 20° C | 22° C 5.15 m/s 61 % 1015 hPa

Photo Gallery of Walk 1 – Via IV Novembre to Lungomare Giovanni Paolo II
Approximately 2.15 km – 1.34 miles

The walk starts in Via IV Novembre – Parrocchia Santi Leonardo e Giovanni Bosco, Via IV Novembre – Via IV Novembre – Via Marcello Negusanti – Via IV Novembre – Via Francesco Palazzi -Via Monte Grappa – Viale XII Settembre – Via F. Cavallotti – Viale Cesare Battisti – Lungomare Giovanni Paolo II

Photo Gallery of Walk 2 – Viale Cristoforo Colombo to Via Gentile da Fabriano
Approximately 2.53 km – 1.57 miles

The walk starts in Viale Cristoforo Colombo – Passeggiata del Lisippo – walk back to Lungomare Mediterraneo – Viale Adriatico – Via della Marina – Viale Nazario Sauro – El pont de Barbon, Via Cesare Simonetti – Via Cairoli – Via Trento – Viale Trieste – Viale Fratelli Cairoli – Parrocchia Chiesa San Giuseppe al Porto – Fano, Viale Fratelli Cairoli – Via Gentile da Fabriano

Photo Gallery of Walk 3  – Via Cavour to Giardini Pier Maria Amiani 
Approximately 0.97 km – 0.60 miles

The walk starts in Via Cavour -Via Vecchia – Via del Vasaro – Via S. Leonardo – Chiesa Ortodossa di S. Antonio Abate, Piazza Antonio Costanzi – Piazza Antonio Costanzi – Corso G. Matteotti – Via Bonaccorsi – Chiesa di San Tommaso, Corso G. Matteotti – Statua della Fortuna, Piazza XX Settembre – Chiesa di San Silvestro (o Madonna di Piazza), Piazza XX Settembre – Corso G. Matteotti – Via Montevecchio – Corso G. Matteotti – Giardini Pier Maria Amiani

Photo Gallery of Walk 4  – Via Arco D’Augusto to Via della Mandria
Approximately 1.83 km – 1.14  miles

The walk starts in Via Arco D’Augusto – Via Guido del Cassero – Via Montevecchio – Ex Chiesa di Santa Maria del Suffragio – Via Palazzi Gisberti – Pincio – Arch of AugustusVia Arco D’Augusto  – Corso G. Matteotti – Via XXIV Maggio – Via Giulio Cesare – Viale Nazario Sauro – Via Mura Augustee – Viale Buozzi – Via della Mandria